Live Review: Grinspoon

 

grinspoon (7 of 18)

Grinspoon
The Wool Exchange
August 3

Its been twenty years since the release of Grinspoon’s iconic
album ‘ Guide to better living’ and to celebrate the band have taken the
album on the road to be played for the first time in the albums entirety.

The Wool Exchange is packed to the rafters in what is probably the biggest show Geelong has had in a while, it seems as though the whole town has come out to have a listen; its shoulder to shoulder in the pit, the predominantly male crowd is amped before the band even take to the stage.

As the light start to flicker signalling the arrival of the band, the crowd erupts into thunderous applause and its straight into it with ‘ Pressure Tested’ kicking things off. ‘ Boundary’, ‘ DCx3’
‘ Sickfest’ and ‘ Railrider’ follow in quick succession, the band hardly pausing to catch their breaths. The auditorium is filled with fist pumping, hard rocking music that hardly stops for a moment.

Phil Jaimeson is electric and full of energy, running and jumping all over the stage in a tornado of energy. He feeds off the crowd’s energy, reaching out to touch fans at times a big goofy grin cracks his face wide open and he’s clearly having a lot of fun. This is a band that really seem to just enjoy playing live together and its apparent with the smiles on their faces.

As the show progresses through the album, the crowd begin to get more energetic themselves, a hard core mosh pit has evolved, crowd surfing and jumping reminiscent of any gig in the early 90s when smashing yourself against a complete stranger was the done thing.

If revellers thought that the album was all they were here to witness, well they’re in for a treat this winter’s evening. After a short break the band quickly take their place back onstage to round out the evening with crowd favourites ‘ Chemical Heart’, ‘ Lost Control’, ‘Ready 1’, ‘ No Reason’ and ‘ Hard Act’

As the evening comes to a close and the crowd file out of the building, Grinspoon have triumphantly managed to take an album that was released at the height of the grunge era and make it seem still fresh and relevant. There is not a hint of clichèd reunion flatness, rather the songs are timeless and the show is high energy chest pumping madness.

Words by Amanda Lee Starkey
Behind the lens Amanda Lee Starkey.

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